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UNC commission recommends re-naming 4 campus buildings

by ace

A commission from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill voted in favor of a recommendation to rename four campus buildings that currently have ties to slave owners or white supremacists

July 11, 2020, 5:36 pm

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CHAPEL HILL, NC – A committee from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill voted in favor of a recommendation to rename four campus buildings that currently have ties to white slave owners or supremacists.

The recommendation of the History, Race and Way Forward Commission on Friday goes to the school chancellor, who may decide to refer it to the Board of Directors, informed the Charlotte Observer. The board, scheduled to meet on Thursday, is expected to discuss a policy to change the names of campus facilities.

The four buildings in question are named after men who “used their positions to impose and maintain violent systems of racial subjugation,” said history professor Jim Leloudis, who co-chairs the commission.

The recommendation comes after the university last month lifted a moratorium in place since 2015, preventing the school from removing names on campus buildings that may be associated with slavery, segregation and white supremacy.

The newspaper reported that the Daniels building was named after Josephus Daniels, a former newspaper editor and white supremacist throughout his life, while Carr Building is named after Julian S. Carr, a supporter of the Ku Klux Klan. Carr delivered a racist speech during the dedication of the Confederate statue on campus known as “Silent Sam”, which was demolished by protesters in 2018.

Aycock and Ruffin’s homes are named after former North Carolina governor Charles Aycock and Thomas Ruffin Sr. and Thomas Ruffin Jr. Aycock led a white supremacy campaign that suppressed black voters, according to the newspaper. The oldest Ruffin was the chief judge of the North Carolina Supreme Court and enslaved more than 100 people.

Aycock led a white supremacy campaign that suppressed black voters. The oldest Ruffin was the chief judge of the North Carolina Supreme Court and enslaved more than 100 people, according to the newspaper.

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